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Pharmacy Law

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ranash
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Topic discussing Pharmacy Law resources and requirements.

ranash
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pharmacy laws

Hi,
I know there has been some talk on pharmacy law and links like; http://www.bcpharmacists.org/about_us/index.php;are helpful but is there a concise book that will be helpful?Because even with my EE I was left guessing many questions related to Law, I am sure it would be even harder with the Qualifying exam.

dotdynamic
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Pharmacy Law in the PEBC exams

The topic of pharmacy law in the PEBC exams can only cover Federal Pharmacy Law. Every province in Canada follows federal pharmacy law but then adds on to it, or amends it slightly with their own laws. As every province's provincial pharmacy law is different, it is not practical for the PEBC to test your knowledge of provincial law. Your knowledge of provincial pharmacy law will be tested in your jurisprudence exam.

The link you provided above directs you to the 'about us' page of the website of the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia. The link you will actually find useful is this:

http://www.bcpharmacists.org/legislation_standards/federal_legislation.php

This document provides you with links to the legal documents and the relevant sections of those documents, that relate to pharmacy law in Canada. Unfortunately, I currently know of no published text that deals with Canadian pharmacy law. If anyone knows of one, please let us know. This means you must use documents such as those provided in the link above (and further links in the links section of this site) to guide you through the legal documents that relate to Canadian pharmacy law.

Sit down and read through these legal documents and take notes as you go. What you really need to know are things like:

  • Prescription Requirements:
    • Who can legally write prescriptions?
    • What must a prescription legally contain?
    • Does a prescription have an expiry date?
    • How do narcotic/targeted drug prescription requirements differ?
  • Drug Scheduling:
    • How are drugs legally scheduled (classified) in Canada?
    • What do these schedules mean in relation to needing a prescription, record keeping, where a drug is kept in the pharmacy, when and where it can be accessed by the public and whether pharmacist supervision is required?
    • What drugs are classified as Targeted and Narcotic?
    • What special requirements apply to Targeted and Narcotic drugs?
  • Special Circumstances:
    • Think about special situations where you will need to know what the law allows. For instance if someone runs out of their medication can you legally provide an emergency supply? What if they are not a regular customer at your pharmacy, they are from another province, or they need a supply of a narcotic/targeted medication?
    • What if you need to get a supply of a medication from another pharmacy? What if it is a narcotic medication? Is this allowed and if so when and how :?

These are just guidelines of the kind of topics the PEBC could cover. So make sure you are asking yourself these kind of questions and finding the answers as you read through applicable legal documents.

If you get really stuck then post your questions in the forum.

Good Luck,
Mat

Paul
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Canadian Pharmacy Laws

Hi Everyone:

I agree with Mat and his answer regarding Canadian Pharmacy Laws: you will only be required to know Canadian NATIONAL laws, not provincial.

There is a really good summary of the national laws in the CPS in the Appendix section. If you have the 2008 CPS, it is on page A2 at the back titled: Narcotic and Controlled Drugs, Benzodiazepines and Other Targeted Substances. I would suggest you memorize this table (it is only 1 1/2 pages). Make certain you understand when you can repeat a Rx and when you cannot. Make sure you understand the difference between a 'part-fill' and a 'refill'. And so on . . .

You will probably be tested at some point in the Non Interative Stations: you might be asked if a particular Rx can be repeated or something similar.

Hope that helps.
Paul

Ahmad Sameh
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PEBC qualifying exam in May

Hi everybody, I'm going to write both qualifying exams this May.
I'm so worried about that, would you tell me all the text books that I have to study as I already have "THERAPEUTIC CHOICES", "PATIENT SELF CARE" and "PHARMACEUTICAL CALCULATIONS".
I want to know if it's important to review the "comprehensive pharmacy review" which I studied for EE and it was more detailed than therapeutic choices
also what are the important topics in "CPS" which I have to check for the "OSCE", and if here's any simple websites for studying "pharmacy law and pharmacy management"??

ranash
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English fluency test

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Amy
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Plea for help - canadian law in practice

Having read the various acts and schedules pertaining to controlled drugs, narcotics etc I have an understanding of requirements for when a written or verbal rx is allowed, if transfers are permitted, records to be made etc. However I would really appreciate it you could give any advice on the following points from a federeal legal perspective for the PEBC qualifying exams:

How to deal with requests for emergency supplies? Especially from other provinces or for restricted medicines.
Who can legally write a prescription and valid dates (other than max 1 year for BDZ and other targeted substances I can find no mention of the time from appropriate date/date of writing that a rx can be first or subsequently dispensed)
How to deal with 'owings' ie when you do not have full amount of stock so this is a part supply other than in accordance with the prescribers wishes

Oh it is frustrating having become confident and familiar with the UK system and legal categories and restrictions I am beginning to panic!

I Fly to Toronto Friday - anyone else sitting the May exams here?

dotdynamic
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Pharmacy Law

Hi Amy,

I know how you feel, I too was very frustrated coming from the UK trying to learn Canadian pharmacy law. All the information is there it's just a little harder to find!

Some of what you are asking about may vary from province to province, as such you shouldn't worry too much as it is unlikely to be examined.

What I can tell you is:

You are correct targeted meds do have a one year expiry date. Apart from that there is no law that I know of that states an expiry for any other type of prescription (though in practice some pharmacies will use a professional guideline of 1 to 2 years).

Narcotic prescriptions do a have a time limit as to when they must be presented at the pharmacy, usually 3 days. After that there is no expiry unless specified by the Dr in some way.

Depending on your definition of restricted meds, you can not legally give emergency supplies of Narcotic or targeted meds under any circumstances. You would encourage the patient to go to a walk-in clinic or hospital emergency room. Law relating to emergency supplies after that can vary from province to province. Generally you can only give an emergency supply if you have some reliable record of what a patient is taking and you are reasonably certain the Dr would give the supply if you were able to reach them.

Good luck with the exam,
Mat